Response Resources

  • Video Aggregation – WatchKnow
  • “The Internet is full of useful information, but it’s disorganized and often unreliable. Despite its problems, the potential of the Internet for education is especially huge. Imagine tapping into that potential.
    Imagine collecting all the best free educational videos made for children, and making them findable and watchable on one website. Then imagine creating many, many more such videos.
    Just think: millions of great short videos, and other watchable media, explaining every topic taught in schools, in every major language on Earth.
    Finally, imagine them all deeply and usefully categorized according to subject, education level, and placed in the order in which topics are typically taught.
    WatchKnow—as in, “You watch, you know”—has started building this resource.

  • Emergency Response; Research: The Institute for Public Knowledge
  • “IPK brings theoretically serious scholarship to bear on major public issues. Located at NYU, it nurtures collaboration among social researchers in New York and around the world. It builds bridges between university-based researchers and organizations pursuing practical action. It supports communication between researchers and broader publics. And it examines transformations in the public sphere, social science, and the university as a social institution as these change the conditions for public knowledge.”

  • Understanding Katrina (This is part of the “Learning from Katrina” program at The Social Science Research Council.)
  • “Perspectives from the Social Sciences As analyses and “spin” of the Katrina crisis grow, we confront the sort of public issue to which a social science response is urgently needed. Accordingly, the SSRC has organized this forum addressing the implications of the tragedy that extend beyond “natural disaster,” “engineering failures,” “cronyism” or other categories of interpretation that do not directly examine the underlying issues—political, social and economic—laid bare by the events surrounding Katrina.”

    see also The Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute (HVRI) and the University of Delaware’s Disaster Research Center

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